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Wednesday, July 5, 2023

Microstory 1923: Lying Liars Lying

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OSI Director: Agent Parsons, Parole Officer Miazga. It’s nice to meet you both. Please, have a seat anywhere. Special Investigator, would you go get us some water?
Special Investigator: Right away.
Leonard: Thanks for having me. And you can just call me Leonard, or even Leo.
Agent Parsons: It’s an honor, sir.
OSI Director: I’ll start with you, Agent. Tell me about yourself. How did you get into fugitive recovery?
Agent Parsons: Well, sir, I wish I could tell you some interesting story about meeting an agent when I was nine, or that my father’s father’s father’s father worked in Fugitive Services. The truth is that I didn’t know what I wanted to specialize in when I signed up for the academy. So I did a full internship rotation, and ended up liking this the most. I’ve actually not been doing it for very long, though you might have assumed by my age. I spent quite a bit of time gaining experience from all facets of law enforcement.
OSI Director: That’s interesting. And you, Mr. Miazga? How did you become a P.O.?
Leonard: I was kind of a legacy. My parents both worked on the parole board for a nearby prison. That’s what they wanted me to do too, but honestly, I didn’t like the idea of sitting behind a table day in, day out. Maybe a third of people are given a second chance while the other two-thirds go back inside. I wanted one hundred percent of the people I worked with to be free.
OSI Director: That’s a fascinating perspective. I can respect that.
Special Investigator: *clears his throat* Um, pardon. Do you want lemon?
OSI Director: No, thank you.
Special Investigator: Lemon? Lemon?
Agent Parsons: I’m all right.
OSI Director: Tell me, Mr. Miazga, what makes you believe that you can get the creature that we’ve captured to finally speak?
Leonard: It’s alone. In order to advance to the level a species like that, or like ourselves, are, they have to value a sense of cooperation. How long have you had it? Six months? I’ve seen enough prisoners to know that everyone breaks. It takes longer for some than for others, but it will always happen, and in my line of business, that’s a good thing. I know that sounds heartless, but if you’ve done something bad enough to end up in a cell, the only way you’re gonna get out is if you admit the justice that put you in there. You may still be angry, and you may be unwilling to change, but the first step is admitting the logic in the outcome. Like I said, we all have our own breaking points, and if it hasn’t reached its point yet, we have to force it, and that may mean changing strategies. That’s all I am for you; a shift in strategy.
OSI Director: *nodding* I can accept this rationale. That’s all I needed to hear. If you’ll excuse me, I must return to my office to make a call.
Agent Parsons: You lied to her about your background. Did you forget that you already told me the truth about your career history?
Leonard: I was just just following your lead. Did you think that I wouldn’t notice your lie? It was my job to spot liars.

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